The Official Hampton Gay village Website.

For full access to the website, registration is required, to do this go to the member page. This will enable you to see a rare photograph of the manor house and other research material.

A site dedicated to Hampton Gay village and its amazing story.........

This is a tribute site to Hampton Gay, a magical place that you want to keep a secret and at the same time, you want to tell everyone about.

Who could imagine that such a small place could hold so much history, this small village can be found in the Domesday Book.

It has seen a tragic train crash in 1874 which claimed many lives on Christmas eve that year, fires at a paper mill now long gone,  a ruin of an Elizabethan house and a near agrarian revolt in 1596...

In the 1500s the manor house began life, and all these years later, it was on seeing the ruin of this once magnificent home, that Hampton Gay cast its spell on us

 

Although Hampton Gay has a long and varied history, we decided to concentrate on the train crash, the mill, the church and the manor house for now, starting roughly from the 1500s.

 

In Antony Burton's book, 'Back Door Britain', he describes the manor house ruin as a mixture of decay and unlikely preservation with rooks nests in the chimney. He tells of window catches that remain intact as though someone could come back one day and close the windows, sadly the window catches are gone now. Also mentioned is the ice house with the hole in the ground surrounded by thick walls, an Elizabethan deep-freeze. Today the small building he mentions still stands, but no hole can be seen.

 We are always looking for old and new photographs, any stories, memories and information on Hampton Gay that may interest us. If you have anything you think we would like to see, and are happy to share on here please get in touch.  Perhaps you are researching your family tree or know that your relatives once lived or worked in Hampton Gay. Maybe you would like to see your relatives photographs on our site?  All enquiries are welcome.

 We would like to let people know we are not historians or archivists, although we do now proudly have Linda Haynes, an archivist from Oxfordshire History Centre, now involved with this site. She is very knowledgeable about the 1874 train crash and has contributed a large amount of her own research and work to the site. We are forever grateful to Linda for her help and support and love having her on board.

 The reason for doing this site comes out of our passion for Hampton Gay, we may sometimes get something wrong but it will be without intention. Any mistakes we will quickly amend, your feedback is always welcome. And do check back regularly, we are constantly updating the site.  Thank you for your interest, we hope you enjoy the Hampton Gay Village story...

 

Sepia photograph of the ruin by Neville Cowan: photographer - who kindly gave us permission to use his picture.

This is a tribute site to Hampton Gay, a magical place that you want to keep a secret and at the same time, you want to tell everyone about.

Who could imagine that such a small place could hold so much history, this small village can be found in the Domesday Book.


It has seen a tragic train crash in 1874 which claimed many lives on Christmas eve that year, fires at a paper mill now long gone,  a ruin of an Elizabethan house and a near agrarian revolt in 1596...

In the 1500s the manor house began life, and all these years later, it was on seeing the ruin of this once magnificent home, that Hampton Gay cast its spell on us

 

Although Hampton Gay has a long and varied history, we decided to concentrate on the train crash, the mill, the church and the manor house for now, starting roughly from the 1500s.


In Antony Burton's book, 'Back Door Britain', he describes the manor house ruin as a mixture of decay and unlikely preservation with rooks nests in the chimney. He tells of window catches that remain intact as though someone could come back one day and close the windows, sadly the window catches are gone now. Also mentioned is the ice house with the hole in the ground surrounded by thick walls, an Elizabethan deep-freeze. Today the small building he mentions still stands, but no hole can be seen.

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